Black Norwegian Elkhound

The Black Norwegian Elkhound is a modern variant of the Grey Norwegian Elkhound. It is a small Spitz breed and is very rare outside the Nordic countries of Scandinavia. It is bred for the same purpose as the Grey Norwegian Elkhound but is smaller, more agile, and easier to recognize in the snow. Historically, it is a much “younger” breed, first bred in Norway during the early 19th century. It is classified by the FCI as a hunting dog, although it is also used as a watchdog, guarddog and herder.

Black Mouth Cur

The Black Mouth Cur is a powerful, agile tree dog of medium size. The body is square or just slightly longer than tall. Legs are long enough to allow the dog to move quickly and with agility in rough terrain. The head is broad with a moderate stop and a moderately broad muzzle. Ears are set high and drop. The tail is straight, set low, and may be any length. The coat is short and close fitting. The Blackmouth Cur should be evaluated as a working dog, and exaggerations or…

Belgian Shepherd Laekenois

The Laekenois is a breed of dog, sometimes classified as a variety of the Belgian Shepherd rather than as a separate breed. “Laekenois” is pronounced /ˈlækɪnwɑː/ LAK-in-wah. This breed is not fully recognized in the United States. However, they can be shown in Britain, Canada, Australia, and throughout Europe, along with all three of the closely related breeds which share a heritage with the Laekenois: the Tervuren, the Malinois, and the Groenendael, the last being shown in the U.S. as the Belgian Sheepdog.

Bavarian Mountain Hound

The Bavarian Mountain Hound is a breed of dog from Germany. As a scent hound, it has been used in Germany since the early 20th century to trail wounded game. It is a cross between the Bavarian Hound and the Hanover Hound.

Basset Fauve de Bretagne

The Basset Fauve de Bretagne is a smallish hound, built along the same lines as the Basset Hound, but lighter all through and longer in the leg. Wire-coated, the coat is very harsh to the touch, dense, red-wheaten or fawn. He measures 32 – 38 cm in height and weighs between 36 – 40 lbs but due the old, and no longer permitted, practice of registering mixed litters of Griffon and Basset Fauves sometimes a litter of bassets will produce a long legged dog more akin to the Griffon. They…

Basset Bleu de Gascogne

The Basset Bleu de Gascogne, also known as the Blue Gascony Basset, is a long-backed, short legged breed of dog of the hound type. The breed originated in the Middle Ages, descended from the Grand Bleu de Gascogne. It nearly became extinct around the early 19th century; its salvation was attributed to one Alain Bourbon. A French native breed, it is rare outside its homeland. It is recognized internationally by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale, in the UK by The Kennel Club, and by the United Kennel Club in the United…

Barbet

The Barbet is a medium-sized, balanced dog, with characteristic thick, woolly, fleecy coat, assuring effective protection against cold and humidity. The length of the body, measured from the point of the shoulder to the point of the buttocks, is slightly more than the height at the withers. There is a characteristic beard, which gave the breed its name. The accepted colours of the breed are solid black, brown, fawn, grey, pale fawn, white, or more or less pied. All shades of red-fawn and pale fawn are permitted. The shade should,…

Azawakh

The Azawakh is a sighthound livestock guardian breed of dog from West Africa. It is also used as a hunting dog, though relegated to a secondary function due to the lack of game in the region. With ancient origins, it is raised throughout the Sahelian zone of Mali, Niger, and Burkina Faso. This region includes the Azawagh Valley for which the breed is named. While commonly associated with the nomadic Tuareg people, they are also bred and owned by other ethnic groups such as the Peulh, Bella, and Hausa. The…

Austrian Pinscher

The Austrian Pinscher (Österreichischer Pinscher, FCI No. 64) is a medium-sized breed of pinscher-type dog from Austria, where dogs of the type were originally farm dogs, keeping barns free of rats and acting as home guards, livestock guardians, and drovers. The name originally given to the breed in 1928 was the Österreichischer Kurzhaarpinscher (Austrian Shorthaired Pinscher) to differentiate it from similarly named breeds, but today in its country of origin the breed is officially called the Österreichischer Pinscher, or Austrian Pinscher in English.

Austrian Black and Tan Hound

Colouring in this breed is highly important; it must be black with small, clearly defined, light to dark fawn markings. Two fawn marks above the eyes must be present. The coat is smooth, dense and short (about 2 cm in length). The long tail is slightly bent and the ears are medium in length and lie flat with rounded tips. Males are 50–56 centimetres (20–22 inches), while females are 48–54 centimetres (19–21 inches). They weigh 15 to 22 kg (33-49 pounds).